Will You Trust Your Doctor?

The Medical Board of California has released guidance to its members with respect to when and why they might recommend cannabis. I wonder how many doctors follow such stringent protocols when deciding to prescribe dangerous, highly addictive pharmaceuticals. (Oh wait, those are federally legal, so it’s ok).

Prior to 1937, cannabis was prescribed by more than 100,000 doctors for treating hundreds of conditions. In the past 80 years, so much knowledge and understanding of this beneficial plant has been lost in the medical community. The human endocannabinoid system was discovered in the late 1980’s and today few doctors understand it, much less talk about it. As with overall nutrition, this is simply not a subject that is covered in medical school.  I find it an enormous disservice that a physiological system so vital to all our other systems is completely neglected and not understood by mainstream medical practitioners.

The notion of the Doctor-Patient Agreement to be provided and signed at the time of the recommendation, along with the simple chart included in the guidelines to help a doctor decide when cannabis might be a good choice infuriates me.  The guidelines state, “A patient need not have failed on all standard medications in order for a physician to recommend or approve the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes”. Yet, the sample flow-chart relating to pain management is clearly biased toward cannabis as a last resort, not as an viable and natural alternative to the dangerous narcotics being prescribed.

As a non-medical professional, it’s obvious to me that the first choice here is opioids and continuing to instill fear and mis-information to patients, by perpetuating the archaic belief that cannabis is highly addictive and dangerous.

But please don’t take my word for it, read the guidelines yourself and draw your own conclusions.